E021 Surviving Society with The Sociological Review: Podcasting to get through your PhD

Welcome to another *live* episode of Surviving Society! In our third and final collaboration with The Sociological Review, our #1 fan Dr Michaela Benson interviews Saskia, Chantelle and Tissot about podcasting, public sociology, and how we’ve helped each other to survive our PhDs. With our lovely audience of fellow PhD students and early career researchers, we discuss why we see sociology as an activist discipline, and the importance of harnessing your rage when you’re doing social research. Thank you so much to everyone in the audience for coming along and being so engaged, and an extra big thank you to Michaela for all her help and support! As always, we’re angry, we’re sweary, we’re laughing, and we’re super grateful to everyone who has made this panel, the podcast and our studies possible.

Edited by Art of Podcast

Recorded in Gateshead at The Sociological Review conference, June 2018

Special thanks to Michaela Benson and everyone at The Sociological Review

 

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E020 Surviving Society with The Sociological Review: Ayona Datta

What do people mean when they talk about the ‘smart city’, and can the smart city ever be inclusive? In our second episode recorded in collaboration with The Sociological Review, Chantelle, Tissot and Saskia talk to Dr Ayona Datta about her work on urban transformations in Indian cities. Ayona argues that we need to be skeptical about whether smart cities can really address deep-rooted inequalities – smart water meters are useless if there’s no infrastructure for clean running water. Tissot tells us about the creative uses of smart technology by homeless people living in London’s financial district, showing that, although digital divides run across class lines, smart technology can change our cities in unplanned and exciting ways.

Warning: This episode contains some academic jargon.

Edited by Art of Podcast

Recorded in Gateshead at The Sociological Review conference, June 2018

Special thanks to Michaela Benson and everyone at The Sociological Review

 

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E019 Surviving Society with The Sociological Review: Satnam Virdee

In the first of our collaborations with The Sociological Review, Professor Satnam Virdee talks to Tissot, Chantelle and Saskia about the importance of ‘race’ when it comes to understanding class and capitalism. Satnam argues that, looking at the last three centuries of capitalism in Britain and its empire, we can see that ‘‘race’ and nation, when it comes to thinking about Britain, run hand in hand’. As informative about the current political moment as he is about histories of capitalism, we especially love Satnam’s challenge to the idea that Britain was ever a ‘white’ nation, and the hope he offers about the role migrants can and have played in the democratisation of our society.

Warning: This episode contains some academic jargon.

Edited by Art of Podcast

Recorded in Gateshead at The Sociological Review conference, June 2018

Special thanks to Michaela Benson and everyone at The Sociological Review

 

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E016 Black women in education with April-Louise Pennant

What does it mean to be a Black woman in the English education system? Special guest April-Louise Pennant talks about why she is researching the educational experiences of Black women, how those women have negotiated racism and sexism in schools and universities, and why it is important that those experiences are heard. Chantelle tells us about her activist work on getting more Black students to do PhDs, and we pull apart the reasons behind the media obsession with ‘grade inflation’. As usual, we’re ranty, we’re sweary, and we’re having a good time!

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E015 Racialising Raheem, martyring Tommy Robinson and finding Finland

In the lead-up to the World Cup, Chantelle is pissed off with the constant stream of racism directed at Raheem Sterling, and Tissot talks about the white supremacist Tommy Robinson, and why locking him up could turn him into a martyr for the far-right. Fresh from her holiday in Finland, Saskia tells us about her experiences of the country, perceptions of Brexit from the Eastern border of Europe, and whether it’s a safe place to visit if you’re a person of colour. As usual, you can expect us to be a little ranty, a little sweary, and full of laughter and biting sociological analysis.

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E014 Surviving Society with Priyamvada Gopal

In this very special episode, Chantelle and Tissot chat to Dr Priyamvada Gopal, English lecturer at the University of Cambridge and brilliant anti-racist activist. Between the three of us, we pull apart racism and representation in universities, colonialism and its collaborators and the abuse that comes with anti-racist activism. There might be a few swear words in there, but mainly it’s an essential conversation that gives context to the struggles people of colour continue to face in UK higher education.

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E013 Rima Saini on ‘race’ and class

How middle class are middle class people of colour? This week we’re joined by Rima Saini, a PhD student who is researching South Asian middle classes in the UK. She unpacks how complicated being middle class can be for people of South Asian origin due to the racisms they face on a daily basis, and how they manage the clash between privilege and prejudice. We also talk about whether Meghan Markle can be an activist and a royal, how theorists of race and class are competing with each other when it comes to explaining Brexit, and why ‘race’ and class can never truly be separated. In an episode which sometimes strays into academic jargon (sorry!), we unravel issues of essentialism, respectability, tokenism, and whether you can ever really escape the ‘race’ and class other people see you as. As usual, there’s a lot of laughing, a bit of ranting, and some strong language!

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