E027 Surviving Society with Ben Rogaly

In this episode we are lucky enough to be talking to Professor Ben Rogaly, human geographer at the University of Sussex, activist, and one of Saskia’s PhD supervisors. Ben tells us about his work with residents of Peterborough, what ‘gangmastering’ is, and why Peterborough is an important place when it comes to thinking about Englishness, migration and racisms. As well as talking about whiteness in rural England, we ask Ben to help us out in thinking about the debate around anti-semitism in the Labour party – why is it such a big political issue? Why is it so complicated to talk about? And what is Zionism? Along the way, Saskia gets to whip out her 16th Century History A Level knowledge, Tissot contributes his info from the Daily Stormer, and Chantelle brings in her insider view on the Midlands. Thank you so much Ben for coming on the pod and for helping us to survive society!

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E026 The Surviving Society Alternative to Woman’s Hour: Rebecca Scroggs

This week we are back with an Alternative to Woman’s Hour featuring actor and activist Rebecca Scroggs! Rebecca shares her experiences in the acting world as a mixed-race Black woman, we talk #MeToo, #TimesUp and #ShutUp (disclaimer: not a real movement…yet), and we have a think about how complicated social class can be. The chair of a housing cooperative, we also talk to Rebecca about the current political climate in relation to social housing, and why squatting is a radical act. Expect lots of laughs, strong language and some digestible academic thinking 🤓

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E025 Joe Kennedy: Authentocrats

This week we travel to Sussex to speak to Dr Joe Kennedy of the University of Gothenburg about his new book Authentocrats and as per we get SUPER POLITICAL. Discussing the policies and legacies of centre-ground political parties, Joe explains how he wants to show that Labour is just as guilty as the Tories and UKIP when it comes to using the ‘authentic’ views of stereotypical small-town voters as an excuse for racist policies. In a conversation that ranges from crime dramas to Game of Thrones to Lord Byron, we ponder why the way in which we talk about places matters, whether a more precise politics is possible, and whether Joe will oblige us by defining neoliberalism. Thank you so much Joe for taking the time to talk to us!

The passage Joe reads at the beginning of the episode is from pp202-203 of AuthentocratsClick here to read a longer extract from Joe’s book.

Warning: This episode contains some academic jargon. We recorded the episode in a cafe so there is some background noise for the first 28 minutes.

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E020 Surviving Society with The Sociological Review: Ayona Datta

What do people mean when they talk about the ‘smart city’, and can the smart city ever be inclusive? In our second episode recorded in collaboration with The Sociological Review, Chantelle, Tissot and Saskia talk to Dr Ayona Datta about her work on urban transformations in Indian cities. Ayona argues that we need to be skeptical about whether smart cities can really address deep-rooted inequalities – smart water meters are useless if there’s no infrastructure for clean running water. Tissot tells us about the creative uses of smart technology by homeless people living in London’s financial district, showing that, although digital divides run across class lines, smart technology can change our cities in unplanned and exciting ways.

Warning: This episode contains some academic jargon.

Edited by Art of Podcast

Recorded in Gateshead at The Sociological Review conference, June 2018

Special thanks to Michaela Benson and everyone at The Sociological Review

 

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E019 Surviving Society with The Sociological Review: Satnam Virdee

In the first of our collaborations with The Sociological Review, Professor Satnam Virdee talks to Tissot, Chantelle and Saskia about the importance of ‘race’ when it comes to understanding class and capitalism. Satnam argues that, looking at the last three centuries of capitalism in Britain and its empire, we can see that ‘‘race’ and nation, when it comes to thinking about Britain, run hand in hand’. As informative about the current political moment as he is about histories of capitalism, we especially love Satnam’s challenge to the idea that Britain was ever a ‘white’ nation, and the hope he offers about the role migrants can and have played in the democratisation of our society.

Warning: This episode contains some academic jargon.

Edited by Art of Podcast

Recorded in Gateshead at The Sociological Review conference, June 2018

Special thanks to Michaela Benson and everyone at The Sociological Review

 

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E014 Surviving Society with Priyamvada Gopal

In this very special episode, Chantelle and Tissot chat to Dr Priyamvada Gopal, English lecturer at the University of Cambridge and brilliant anti-racist activist. Between the three of us, we pull apart racism and representation in universities, colonialism and its collaborators and the abuse that comes with anti-racist activism. There might be a few swear words in there, but mainly it’s an essential conversation that gives context to the struggles people of colour continue to face in UK higher education.

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E013 Rima Saini on ‘race’ and class

How middle class are middle class people of colour? This week we’re joined by Rima Saini, a PhD student who is researching South Asian middle classes in the UK. She unpacks how complicated being middle class can be for people of South Asian origin due to the racisms they face on a daily basis, and how they manage the clash between privilege and prejudice. We also talk about whether Meghan Markle can be an activist and a royal, how theorists of race and class are competing with each other when it comes to explaining Brexit, and why ‘race’ and class can never truly be separated. In an episode which sometimes strays into academic jargon (sorry!), we unravel issues of essentialism, respectability, tokenism, and whether you can ever really escape the ‘race’ and class other people see you as. As usual, there’s a lot of laughing, a bit of ranting, and some strong language!

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E012 The Surviving Society Alternative to Woman’s Hour: Intersectionality

In our second Surviving Society Alternative to Woman’s hour we are breaking down intersectionality! Special guest Brenda talks us through her role as a children’s counsellor, arguing that women and children who have been victims of domestic abuse suffer further violence at the hands of the state due to cuts to vital services, Saskia discusses one of the ultimate feminist conundrums of body image, and Chantelle wants early career researchers to recognise that, despite shitty contracts and precarity, to work in academia is to be in a position of privilege. Throughout the episode, we try to bear in mind the ways in which oppressions can intersect along the lines of gender, class, ‘race’, migration status and perceived body size. Expect the usual strong language, ranting and laughter!

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E010 #USSStrikes Special: Universities, value for money, racism

Surviving Society is proud to present our first ever live podcast! Recorded at our #USSStrikes teachout at Goldsmiths College on 15 March 2018, we look at the government’s obsession with ‘value for money’ in higher education and the part racism plays in university life. Expect the usual ranting, laughing and swearing, but this time with a live audience!

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E007 The Surviving Society Alternative to Woman’s Hour

This week Chantelle and Saskia launch the first Surviving Society Alternative to Woman’s Hour! Beginning with the comments made by Catherine Deneuve about the #metoo campaign, in this episode we challenge commentators who think experiences of sexual harassment and assault are up for debate and talk about why we should avoid silencing different experiences. We discuss the missing aspects of these conversations like ‘race’, class and trans issues, our own journeys with feminism, and why we need to have a more fluid understanding of what it means to be a woman in contemporary society. Expect the usual strong language, laughter and ranting throughout.

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